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11 Apr 2000 | Soul Jazz

Baltimore

Man Shot on Charm City Bus is Remember by Family

Man Shot on Charm City Bus is Remember by Family

 

 

 

After Sean Wood left his job at H&S Bakery last week, a man attempted to rob him, followed him onto the Charm City Circulator bus and shot him to death, Baltimore police said Tuesday.
Department spokesman T.J. Smith confirmed Tuesday that the shooting began as a robbery. Police said previously that Wood, 26, and the suspect were involved in an argument before Wood boarded the bus on the afternoon of March 8 in the 200 block of S. Broadway in East Baltimore.

Department spokesman T.J. Smith confirmed Tuesday that the shooting began as a robbery. Police said previously that Wood, 26, and the suspect were involved in an argument before Wood boarded the bus on the afternoon of March 8 in the 200 block of S. Broadway in East Baltimore.
Wood’s mother, Clara Wood, said her son fought back, arguing with the suspect, then getting on the bus, before being shot in the stomach. Sean Wood, her only child, was later pronounced dead at the hospital.
“A guy just came on that bus and just shot him,” she said.

Police have not made an arrest in Wood’s killing, which is one of 61 homicides so far this year.
Smith said the Police Department released video that captures three individuals who are seen walking in the area just before the shooting. One of them is seen running from the scene after the shooting occurred. Police are trying to identify all three.

The shooting occurred on the Green Line, which runs from City Hall to Fells Point to Johns Hopkins Hospital, the city’s Department of Transportation said.
“It is our every intention to make sure every passenger is safe while traveling on our buses,” the agency said in a statement. “We are truly saddened by this unfortunate incident.”

On Tuesday afternoon, Wood’s family and a handful of friends gathered at the March Funeral Home on North Avenue for a viewing. Among the mourners was Wood’s grandmother, Pearline Brunson, who lives in South Carolina. Too distraught to make the drive, she rode an Amtrak train to Baltimore on Sunday.

“I don’t see how people can do that. He was a good person. I don’t understand why somebody wanted to take his life like that,” said Brunson, who misses speaking to her eldest grandchild every day.
When she saw his body in the casket, dressed in a crisp blue plaid button-down shirt, with his arms carefully folded, she burst into tears.
“Oh my god. Oh my god,” Brunson cried.
Clara Wood attempted to console her mother but then she too became overwhelmed and collapsed into a chair next to the casket.
“Come on, we just got to be strong, Clara,” Brunson told her.
Clara Wood said she heard about the shooting on a TV news broadcast and had hoped it was no one she knew. She said detectives called her early the next morning, asking her to leave work.
Wood called Brunson to tell her about the call, but Brunson said she knew her grandson was dead.
“I already knew. Nobody have to tell me,” she said. “It was just like I was in a nightmare.”
When Clara Wood returned to her Weaver Avenue home in Northeast Baltimore, waiting detectives broke the news, she said.
Clara Wood said her son has a 6-year-old son and a 4-year-old daughter. Brunson said he told her he planned to shop for Easter outfits for them when he got paid on Friday.
A recent photo saved to Clara Wood’s phone shows her son with his two children wearing birthday hats. An older photo depicts Sean Wood holding his son when he was just an infant. In another he smiled behind pallets of bread at H&S Bakery. Wood and Brunson said he was proud of his job.
Brunson often worried about her eldest grandchild, whom she affectionately nicknamed “Pee Wee” at birth because of his size. He had no siblings and was often alone, and she was concerned about his safety in a city with so many murders. She worried about him staying at his grandfather’s apartment at the Douglass Homes because she said the area was dangerous
Brunson said she left Baltimore years ago, partly because of the violence.
“Everybody in South Carolina calls Baltimore a graveyard,” she said.
But Brunson said she takes some comfort believing that her son was not alone when he was killed.
“I know he was walking with God. But God didn’t do that,” she said of the murder.
jkanderson@baltsun.com
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March 15th, 2017

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